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20110731
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as legal. ceremonies were held from manhattan to nighing a ray falls. >> last-minute captures on the big day. same-sex couples sweltering in the heat. >> with the celebration comes spending. it's thought same-sex marriages will boost the country by $3 million over the next three years. a handful of states have legalized same-sex marriage and new york is the one that will draw in the crowds. a destination in its own right. -- in its own rite. >> mark mattias had his cupcakes at the ready. his customers in this predominantly gay area of manhattan are now planning their weddings. >> roughly 50% of our business is weddings and we're expecting a big boost in revenue due to same-sex couples's weddings. >> the federal government here doesn't recognize these weddings. >> if one of us should pass away, the other cannot get social security and with regard to finances and taxes, we're not just treated the same as a heterosexual coup. >> whatever the picture at the national level, new york is welcoming same-sex couples with open arms, and after years of waiting, newlyweds are ready to throw the ulti
planet. >> you hear about alternatives, right? wind, solar, algae. >> i think it's got to work on a big scale. and i think it's got to be affordable. >> so, where are they? >> it has to work in the real world. at chevron, we're investing millions in solar and biofuel technology to make it work. >> we've got to get on this now. >> right now. the william and flora hewlett foundation, working to solve social and environmental problems at home and around the world. and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> brown: much talk, but little movement: the high-stakes debt and deficit impasse continued today, and last night's dueling primetime speeches by president obama and speaker boehner only seemed to reinforce the bitter stalemate over raising the country's borrowing limit. newshour congressional correspondent kwame holman begins our coverage. >> reporter: it was house speaker john boehner who had the last word
to be rescued. >> i was sleeping and heard a big sound. >> i suddenly heard a strange sound, like a large trade explosion sound, so i walked outside. -- like a large trade explosion. -- train explosion. >> they are calling it the worst rain in a century. hundreds of thousands -- hundreds of houses flooded. rhodes often impossible to accept with the health of rescue teams -- roads often impossible to pass except with the help of rescue teams. lucy williamson, bbc news, seoul, korea. >> tomorrow in london, more than 1000 british veterans who were exposed to nuclear testing in the 1950's and lost their case for damages will be hoping the supreme court will give them permission to appeal. the elderly veterans believe there ill health is due to exposure during the tests, but the ministry of defence has contested that claims since 2004. our correspondent reports. >> not until 10 seconds and could anybody in look. so intense was the man made sun that people miles away with their back turns and hands over their eyes are aware of its fantastic brilliance. >> basically, we had no protection, no warning.
to take on our deficit is with a balanced approach. one where the wealthiest americans and big corporations pay their fair share too. >> reporter: meanwhile the leader of the democratic majority in the senate, harry reid, has been working on a competing proposal. it would raise the debt ceiling and cut $2.7 trillion in spending. the savings would come from federal agencies and defense spending but avoid controversial changes to entitlement programs and the u.s. tax code. >> so now all the republicans have to do is say yes. unfortunately, the republicans who used to run the congress on the caucuses are being driven by the radical, right wing that is so in tune with the tea party. they want their leaders to ignore the american people as they're doing. they want their leaders to ignore the business leaders like the chamber of commerce that they're ignoring. and even a majority of republicans around this country want something to happen and they're refusing to do that. >> reporter: this afternoon reid's plan got official endorsement from the white house spokesman describing it as a
of the wounds were really, really, really big. some of them had, you know, they had been running for their lives. they had their bones broken. some of them, you know, they were full of blood and dirt. >> reporter: this was the youth camp last year. norway's prime minister visiting. he was due at the camp tomorrow to give a speech. this was the youth camp just yesterday. these young people, the targets of an attack that has come out of the blue on a sunny summer's day, a day of horror, so far unexplained. >> woodruff: president obama extended his condolences to norwegians today, and offered american assistance with the investigation. for more on all this, we're joined by ahnders tvegard of norwegian public broadcasting. we thank you both. and i'm going to go to you first, in oslo. what is the latest that's known on the casualties, dead and injured? >> yeah, what they are telling about what happened out on the island, they have so far said that there are ten casualties at the island but they are not ruling out that there can be some more people that are being killed out there. they are even found
have seen last sites before and this is really, really big. and the fact that it can have so much for the nation behind it is quite unbelievable. -- coordination behind it is quite unbelievable. >> al-shabab says there is no famine in the country and accuses the u.n. of examined -- a guy during the drive for political reasons. aid agencies remain in place. caroline hawley reports. you may find some of these images distressing. >> the refugee camps in kenya. the body of a charm lies next to those still struggling for life. -- of a child lies next to those still struggling for life. a combination of war and drought has created a devastating emergency, displacing huge numbers of somalis with in their own country, too. the capital, mogadishu, is not safe. it is still a magnet for people in need. >> she is 80 years old and she is taking care of five children. she is the grandmother. the father and mother died because of disease. >> the hardline islamic group al-shabab has links to al qaeda and is fighting the western government of somalia. the government is in control of olli the cente
it is to investigate them. >> the police are trained to handle this, but this is so big and it was so many youngsters that was killed, so i think it's very difficult that they are taking care of each other, they are talking, debriefing every night, and we'll manage. >> despite admitting the attacks, anders breivik is expected to deny criminal responsibility when he appears in court. the stunned nation will be listening closely to his every word. >> well, we're just going to bring some pictures that have come in to us from norway that were taken just a few minutes after the actual attack, the bomb blast that hit oslo, and these are -- these are live pictures we're bringing you. first of all, they came to us from norway of people scattered, it looks like, in remembrance in the country. well, let's speak now to the former prime minister of the country, now the secretary general of the council of europe. thanks very much indeed for joining us. first of all, your report on this attack, so many young people, innocent people killed in this way. >> yes, it's getting worse and worse for us to think about what
is on the left. >> a big difference in appearance. also, we can see here, it clings to the side of the glass. reminds me of my grandmother making raspberry jam. as here, ok, this is is much more flagrant, gooseberries. it's just generally lighter. >> so you can tell that that glass is more expensive. >> it's all about concentration. >> but would you buy such an expensive bottle? >> no. [laughing] no. certainly not. >> thanks so much. >> not to drink. no way. >> thank you very much, indeed. >> the new owner says he'll open the bottle to celebrate an anniversary. at around 10,000 pounds a glass, let's hope it doesn't disappoint. bbc news in central london. >> well that brings us to the end of today's broadcast. for all of us at "bbc world news america" thank you for watching. see you back here tomorrow. >> make sense of international news at bbc.com/news. >> funding was made possible by the freeman foundation of new york, stowe, vermont, and honolulu, newman's own foundation, and union bank. >> union bank has put its global financial strength to work for a wide range of companies, from small b
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8